mom worried about college

  FAFSA changes – The COVID relief bill passed at the end of 2020 also included some significant changes to the FAFSA, including how multiple students in college are treated and how divorced parents complete it. While the changes do not go into effect until the 2023-24 school year, that year’s FAFSA will use tax…

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FAFSA changes passed by Congress

  The COVID relief bill passed at the end of 2020 also included some significant changes to the FAFSA. While the changes do not go into effect until the 2023-24 school year, that year’s FAFSA will use tax information from 2021, so there are current day considerations. And because the FAFSA is completed each year…

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The FAFSA is a quintessential government form, meaning it isn’t always as easy to understand as it should be. And with over 100 questions to navigate, far too many families make mistakes that are unnecessarily costing them money. Money Magazine compiled the following tips on how to tackle the 6 trickiest questions: Questions 24 and…

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FAFSA says how much you can pay for college, but it’s often wrong – The NY Times explains what the FAFSA says you can afford is usually less than you will end up paying, which comes as a big surprise to many families. This is an important read as you plan how to make the…

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While the rising cost is certainly a factor, it is often the decisions that families themselves make that cause them to unnecessarily pay more for college than they should (and potentially increase student debt). As hard as it might be, there are instances where a family needs to recognize a college-related decision will cost them…

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Completing the FAFSA when parents are divorced is one of the most confusing scenarios for families, because custodial terms and who claims the child on the tax return do not necessarily apply. Which parent info is provided on the FAFSA? Regardless of the legal custody arrangement, the divorced parent with whom the student lived with more…

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There is a FAFSA issue that has been tripping up families with qualified retirement savings rollovers that can result in wildly inflated EFC’s (expected family contributions), thus reducing the amount of financial aid they qualify for. Retirement savings moved from one qualified retirement plan to another qualified plan should not be reported as untaxed income…

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